Are You Always in a Hurry? Count the Cost of Yes

Are You Always in a Hurry? Count the Cost of Yes

“I’m overwhelmed. I just need a break!” I said to my counselor. Minutes later, I left her second story office and hurried the length of the deserted hallway. I glanced at my phone while descending the stairs. My phone was dead, but I knew it was close to 4:00. I had just enough time to get to school and pick up my kids before their practices ended at 4:30. As I took the next step, I missed the stair and tumbled forward. When I came to a stop, I heard a loud “pop.” The pain was unbearable.

Tears came fast and furious and I cried out for help.

No one heard me.

I tried to push myself up to stand, but my left foot refused to bear any weight.

I cried for help again, thinking there must be someone nearby.

Again, no one heard me.

I tried my phone a second time in vain. My husband was in New York on business. Picking up the kids wouldn’t wait. I gritted my teeth and pushed myself up from the base of the stairs. I could stand on my right foot, but my left was completely useless. With great pain, I hopped to the car, frequently banging my left foot against the pavement. I managed to get myself into the car and drive across town to the school, sobbing the entire way.

The “break” I needed

I’d love to tell you my injuries were minimal and I healed quickly, but that’s not what happened. Instead, I got the “break” I needed in the form of broken bones and multiple sprains in my foot and ankle, six months of pain, restrictions, physical therapy, and a complete overhaul of my demanding pace of life.

Before my fall, I was at a breaking-point. Maybe you’ve been there too.

I had taken on too many responsibilities – running a nonprofit, serving as team mom, leading a Bible study, making play costumes, and so much more. I spent the previous year moving at record speed. I like to keep busy, but I was over-committed, under-rested, and probably not the most pleasant person to be around.

We don’t have to live that way.

Count the cost of yes

What I learned through my ordeal was that I’m capable of only so much. I’m learning to live within my limits. That means I only commit to a certain number of activities, projects and responsibilities. When my plate is full, I must eliminate an item before adding another. I guard my time and energy or they’ll be swallowed up by my desire to say “yes” to more than I can sanely accomplish.

If I hadn’t been rushed and feeling overwhelmed, I’m sure I wouldn’t have missed that step. I likely wouldn’t have even been in counselor’s office that day. The cost of over-commitment was high.

One of the things I contemplated during my recovery was that Jesus never rushed. He moved at an intentional pace. His time of ministry on earth was very brief, only three years. If anyone had a reason to pick his pace and do more than humanly possible, it was Jesus. But, he didn’t.

I’m learning to follow his example.

Luke 14:28 reminds us to count the cost, “For which of you, desiring to build a tower, does not first sit down and count the cost, whether he has enough to complete it?”

When we’re tempted to say “yes” and add one more thing to our busy schedules, pause and acknowledge that “yes” will cost us something. At the very least, it means we have to say “no” to other opportunities.

What will saying “yes” cost you? Will it cost your peace? Dilute your focus?

When we commit to pause and count the cost before taking on another thing, we are empowered to manage the opportunities that come our way. We focus on what we’re meant to do, the things most important to us. We walk in freedom, unhurried and confident.

What are you doing to follow Jesus’ example of walking out your life intentionally and unhurried? How have you learned to live within the limits of your time and energy?


cost of yesElizabeth M. Thompson is a writer and speaker. Prayer is her super-power and she loves helping women develop meaningful prayer lives. She and her husband have three children. They live, bike, kayak, and hike along the American River near Sacramento, CA. Stop by her website for a free download of “Jumpstart Your Stalled Prayer Life.”

Episode #256:  What We’ve Learned Since Releasing Overwhelmed Part 3: Decluttering is NOT One and Done!

Episode #256: What We’ve Learned Since Releasing Overwhelmed Part 3: Decluttering is NOT One and Done!

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Kathi and Cheri Gregory, co-author of Overwhelmed, are here for Part 3 of the series, What We’ve Learned Since Releasing Overwhelmed.  They discuss how decluttering is ongoing. It isn’t one and done; it is a day in and day out process.

As our recent Spring Fling participants have tackled their clutter, they realized that it wasn’t just a two-week project.  It is something you have to keep working at.  And each person has their own hurdles to work through. Our hosts discuss what some of the ah-ha moments were for them as well as participants. AS one clears her clutter, what once brought emptiness is now viewed as spaciousness.  Kathi and Cheri discuss the discovery of how getting rid of the clutter provides room for new opportunities.

Listen for tips to get the support you need to deal with clutter and being overwhelmed.

Mentioned In the Podcast

Trello – Great for organizing projects and keeping everyone on the team on track.

Overwhelmed: How to Quiet the Chaos and Restore Your Sanity

Episode #255: How to Ask For What You Want and Need

Episode #255: How to Ask For What You Want and Need

What we've learned since Overwhelmed

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Do you ask for what you need or want?

Cheri Gregory, co-author of Overwhelmed, joins Kathi for the second podcast in a series about “What I’ve Learned Since Writing Overwhelmed.”

They have learned a number of things and one thing that Cheri found profound, “Women are bad at articulating what we want or need without feeling guilty.”  As women, we are always preventing problems for other people instead of focusing on our own wants, needs, expectations, and communication.

Listen in to learn about their tips for handling our own wants and needs guilt free.

Our Gift to You

Download our guide to creating a personal manifesto. This booklet will help you create your own manifesto so you can begin to live your own values.

Episode #254: How to Stop Giving Other People Authority Over Our Lives

Episode #254: How to Stop Giving Other People Authority Over Our Lives

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Build your own dreams or someone will hire you to build theirs. ~ Farrah Gray

Co-Author of Overwhelmed, Cheri Gregory, joins Kathi for a four week series to discuss what they have learned since writing Overwhelmed. This week, the authors discuss the one that that has stood out to them the most: “Women turn over their power to external sources too often.”

Often, we let what we think we should do for others dictate what we spend our time and energy on. But what if God isn’t surprised by what our circumstances are and has called us to more anyways? Kathi and Cheri discuss ways they’ve let others take over their time and emotions, and ways they’ve changed their own behavior to better handle situations that overwhelm their relationships, time and energy.

What are the steps you can take to take back control of your life?

Our Gift to You

Download our guide to creating a personal manifesto. This booklet will help you create your own manifesto so you can begin to live your own values.

Maximize Your Quiet Times By Minimizing

Maximize Your Quiet Times By Minimizing

maximize your quiet time

Do you ever look at your 1,000-page Bible and think, “Where do I even start?”

We know we’re supposed to study God’s Word, but it’s easy to get bogged down with all the different Bible study methods.  Should you do a verse-by-verse study, a character study or study inductively? You could read an Old Testament passage, New Testament passage and a Psalm a day, or there’s always the option to read a chapter of Proverbs everyday.

So many choices leave a girl feeling exhausted before you even crack open the book.

How to maximize your quiet time

I’ve discovered a simple way to de-clutter quiet time: read a chapter a day and pray.

When you maximize your quiet time by minimizing, here’s what happens:

  • your focus improves since you’re digesting smaller chunks of scripture
  • you retain what you read
  • you slow your tempo enough to enjoy God’s word

I was a bit skeptical of the read-a-chapter-a-day-and-pray idea. Do less, learn more? That’s just crazy talk!

But friends, this is exactly what is happening. I added a commentary reading to my quiet time, and would encourage you to do the same, because it’s helped open my eyes to the depth of God’s word.

Listen, if you watch reality TV, flip to the Old Testament instead. I’m reading the book of 1 Samuel and there is intrigue, scandal, suspense, love stories and even a heroine in one account (check out 1 Samuel 25). The reading is so good I’ve had to force myself to stop reading in order to stick to focusing on one chapter a day!

How simplicity leads to depth

When we simplify like this, it clears away the clutter of too many options … and the guilt of avoiding quiet time.  We can commit to spending time with God daily because we have a doable plan. Simplicity actually leads to depth.

So, here’s what I want you to do:

– Pick one book of the Bible you’d like to read and commit to making it through that one book by reading one chapter a day.
– After you read, spend time talking to God in prayer and listening.
– As you read, consider these questions:

  • What do I learn about God, Jesus or the Holy Spirit through this chapter?
  • What is the major theme or takeaway from this chapter?
  • How does this chapter contribute to the overall teaching of this book of the Bible?
  • What is God trying to teach me through this chapter?

You can do this!

Maximize by minimizing, and you’ll consistently spend time with God.


Kate Hollimon delights in helping women learn their God-given purpose while growing in Christ through the study of scripture. Kate is a speaker and blogger who designed the Live Your Purpose Workshop Live Your Purpose Workshop to help women discover their purpose to glorify God. Kate is married to her husband Matthew of seven years and together they have two kiddos, a boy and a girl, and are in the thick of sippy cups, potty training, temper tantrums and peanut butter and jellies.  You can connect with Kate at www.katehollimon.com.