find your focus

I’ve got to get focused on this project.

I set down my pen.

What usually works isn’t working right now.

I lean back in my chair.

And that’s okay.

I exhale.

This situation is different.

Several major projects are all due at the same time, and every single one is now or never.
I could say “no” to some of them.

Honestly, though, I don’t want to. I don’t want to miss out on any of these exciting opportunities.
I want to move forward with every single one.

But how?

When You Just Can’t Find Your Focus

Maybe you’ve been in a similar situation: You’re trying to make progress, but your brain can’t focus because it’s going in a dozen different directions at the same time.

In my situation, I had pushed myself to do the work—even though I really wanted to do anything but this type of work in the moment.

I went through all the usual techniques that typically help me focus:

  • I took a walk.
  • I turned off all distractions.
  • I set a timer.

But all of my fail-safe strategies failed.

The harder I tried, the muddier my mind became. I couldn’t make myself make progress.

Or even get started.

Which was crazy. These were projects I really wanted to accomplish, and I was grateful for the opportunities.

At the same time, they were demanding tasks for me. Each project involved writing. And not just ordinary writing, but the most challenging kind of writing where every word mattered.

I needed a new strategy.

What Made the Difference

Here’s what worked for me:

  • I used pen-and-paper, which forced me to slow down.
  • I limited my work to what would fit on one page, which narrowed my focus.
  • I quickly skipped over anything that wasn’t the best fit, which gave me momentum.
  • I saved ill-fitting ideas for later projects, which kept me from getting bogged down.

What made the difference?

My mind stayed focused on one task at a time without getting distracted by “Shiny Object Syndrome.”

This may be a challenge for you, too.

Combining strategies you don’t typically put together will help you find your focus.

How to find what helps you focus

Learning to combine old strategies in new ways is a valuable skill.

You already do this in the kitchen when you tweak a recipe — trying a little of this, a little of that, until the flavors blend together just so.

Here’s how to combine strategies to help you quickly find focus:

1)        Make a list of the typical strategies that help you focus.

(For ideas, download your free “5 Simple Ways to Quickly Find Your Focus”  checklist.)

2)        Check any strategies that usually work for you.

3)        Circle any new strategies that intrigue you.

4)        Combine several different strategies into a new “recipe.”

5)        Now, experiment with it.

How will you know that you’ve found the right combination of strategies?

You’ll start to feel unstuck. You’ll get going again.

As you gain momentum, you’ll make great progress.

All because you finally found your focus.

find your focus

Question:  What’s one strategy that helps you find your focus?


find your focusMary Lou Caskey trains Christian coaches and communicators to influence hearts through the power of story. If you want to become a transformative storyteller, connect with Mary Lou and get her free quiz, “Is It the Best Time to Share a Personal Story?”

 

 

 

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