#587 Taking Organization to the Next Level: Advanced Tips for Accessibility and Aesthetics

#587 Taking Organization to the Next Level: Advanced Tips for Accessibility and Aesthetics

587: Taking Organization to the Next Level: Advanced Tips for Accessibility and Aesthetics

Can our spaces be organized and look great at the same time?

Yes, they can! Clutter Free Academy’s own Deanna Day Young joins Kathi Lipp today in this continuation of last week’s episode. (Haven’t listened to Episode 586 Unlocking the Power of Organization: Expert Tips from Deanna Day Young yet? Click here! ) This week is all about the Double-A: accessibility and aesthetics. Meaning it is easy to access but looks pretty sitting. Deanna and Kathi chat and laugh their way through the Three Steps to Organization 101. Kitchen ideas? It’s in here. Organizing with things you already have? It’s in here. What do do with bathroom towels? It’s in here, too.

Listen in as Deanna  and Kathi share the Three Steps to Organization 101 plus so many real-life examples:

  1. Decluttering
    • You don’t need to buy a new item. Kathi uses books as a pedestal to elevate cherished items!
  2. Putting things where they make sense
    • Deanna has drawer pulls for her silverware drawer that looks like silverware!
  3.  Labeling
    • Laundry soap can be aesthetically pleasing!

Check out the photographic evidence in the show notes.

         

Be sure to sign up here and be notified when the next episode is released.

 

 

The Accidental Homesteader: What I’ve Learned About Chickens, Compost, and Creating Home

Homesteading [hohm-sted-ing]
noun
1. an act or instance of establishing a homestead.
2. the act of loving where you live so much that you actively ignore the fact that your house is trying to kill you on a regular basis.

For Kathi Lipp and her husband, Roger, buying a house in one of the most remote parts of Northern California was never part of the plan; many of life’s biggest, most rewarding adventures rarely are.

Kathi shares the hard-won wisdom she’s gained on her homestead journey to help you accomplish more at home, gain fresh perspective, and give yourself grace in the process. Here’s a handful of the lessons Kathi shares:

  • Prepare before the need arises
  • Everything is always in process, including us
  • Your best household solution is time and patience
  • You don’t have to do everything the hard way
  • Be open to new and better ways of doing things
  • A lot of small changes make a huge difference.
    Highly practical, humorous, and inspirational, The Accidental Homesteader will encourage you to live with more peace, joy, and contentment.

Order your copy of The Accidental Homesteader: What I’ve Learned About Chickens, Compost, and Creating Home here.

Kathi’s Favorites:

Cabinet Pulls Spoon Knife Fork Shape Door Handles Hole Center 3″ Silver

Quart Compact Stackable Plastic Storage Drawer

18 Gallon Holiday Storage Containers, Durable Latching Lids, Clear Bins, Red Lids/Green Handles

 

 

Kathi and Deanna both store things where they make sense to them. Kathi stores bath towels in the bathroom. Deanna stores swimsuits with beach towels.

Question: Do you have a similar storage hack you could share? Let’s chat in the comments.

 

Let’s stay connected

To share your thoughts:

  • Leave a note in the comment section below.
  • Leave an honest review on iTunes. Your ratings and reviews really help and I read each one.

Subscribe on iTunes or subscribe to our newsletter now.

Meet Our Guest 

 

Deanna Day Young

Deanna lives in southeast Indiana on the Young family farm with her husband of 35 years. She and Roger have two grown daughters.

Deanna is the Director of Operations for Iron Timbers, a family-owned custom furniture business featured currently, and for several years, on HGTV’s Good Bones show. Prior to this position, she was a paralegal and managed the international trademark portfolio for 34 years for the Hill-Rom division of Baxter International. Deanna has a degree in Journalism and Speech Communications from Ball State University and a Paralegal Certification from Saint Mary of the Woods College.

Fun Fact – Deanna and her daughter are also Chi Omega sorority sisters!! Hoot Hoot.

You can connect with Deanna at deannadayyoung.com

Transcript

#586 Unlocking the Power of Organization: Expert Tips from Deanna Day Young

#586 Unlocking the Power of Organization: Expert Tips from Deanna Day Young

586: Unlocking the Power of Organization: Expert Tips from Deanna Day Young

Several years ago, Deanna Day Young joined Kathi Lipp’s Clutter Free Academy. Deanna felt pretty confident about her organizational skills, but she realized there is always more to learn and thought she could learn some good strategies for organization. However, what she actually realized is that she had previously been trying to organize a bunch of clutter! Since then, Deanna has strengthened her decluttering muscles, and on today’s podcast Kathi asks Deanna to share her best advice for someone who is starting out on their decluttering and organization journey. 

Listen in as Deanna shares:

  1. What is the most important thing to do first?
  2. Three simple steps to organize any space.
  3. When to be creative, and when to keep it simple.

Next week, Deanna and Kathi will return and dive deeper into aesthetics. How can we be organized and still make it look great at the same time? 

Be sure to sign up here and be notified when the next episode is released.

 

The Accidental Homesteader: What I’ve Learned About Chickens, Compost, and Creating Home

Homesteading [hohm-sted-ing]
noun
1. an act or instance of establishing a homestead.
2. the act of loving where you live so much that you actively ignore the fact that your house is trying to kill you on a regular basis.

For Kathi Lipp and her husband, Roger, buying a house in one of the most remote parts of Northern California was never part of the plan; many of life’s biggest, most rewarding adventures rarely are.

Kathi shares the hard-won wisdom she’s gained on her homestead journey to help you accomplish more at home, gain fresh perspective, and give yourself grace in the process. Here’s a handful of the lessons Kathi shares:

  • Prepare before the need arises
  • Everything is always in process, including us
  • Your best household solution is time and patience
  • You don’t have to do everything the hard way
  • Be open to new and better ways of doing things
  • A lot of small changes make a huge difference.
    Highly practical, humorous, and inspirational, The Accidental Homesteader will encourage you to live with more peace, joy, and contentment.

Order your copy of The Accidental Homesteader: What I’ve Learned About Chickens, Compost, and Creating Home here.

Kathi feels like she had to learn the skills of organization, while Deanna feels that organization came more naturally to her. This difference has allowed them to learn from each other!

Question: Are you a natural organizer, or is this something you have to work harder to learn? Tell us in the comments and let’s help one another!

 

Let’s stay connected

To share your thoughts:

  • Leave a note in the comment section below.
  • Leave an honest review on iTunes. Your ratings and reviews really help and I read each one.

Subscribe on iTunes or subscribe to our newsletter now.

Meet Our Guest 

 

Deanna Day Young

Deanna lives in southeast Indiana on the Young family farm with her husband of 35 years. She and Roger have two grown daughters.

Deanna is the Director of Operations for Iron Timbers, a family-owned custom furniture business featured currently, and for several years, on HGTV’s Good Bones show.  Prior to this position, she was a paralegal and managed the international trademark portfolio for 34 years for the Hill-Rom division of Baxter International.  Deanna has a degree in Journalism and Speech Communications from Ball State University and a Paralegal Certification from Saint Mary of the Woods College.

Fun Fact – Deanna and her daughter are also Chi Omega sorority sisters!! Hoot Hoot.

You can connect with Deanna at deannadayyoung.com

Transcript

#582 Garden Or Grocery Store: Eating Like a Homesteader No Matter Where You Call Home – Part 2

#582 Garden Or Grocery Store: Eating Like a Homesteader No Matter Where You Call Home – Part 2

582: Garden Or Grocery Store: Eating Like a Homesteader No Matter Where You Call Home, Part 2

Have you ever read the ingredients on the bread you buy from the grocery store and thought, “I can’t even pronounce these words! What are they?” Maybe you’d like to take control over what you put into your meals but don’t know where to start?

Start here!

In this episode, Kathi and Roger Lipp discuss what they have learned on their homestead journey about getting closer to the source of their food and what goes into the meals they prepare. As they continue to celebrate the release of Kathi’s new book “The Accidental Homesteader: What I’ve Learned About Chickens, Compost, and Creating Home”, Kathi and Roger share ways we can all eat like a homesteader even if we don’t have a garden.

For example:

  • Making your own bread (Keep scrolling for recipes!)
  • Making your own cake & brownie mixes
  • Making your own cheese (Kathi and Roger are in LOVE with her homemade mozzarella cheese.)
  • Canning and preserving your abundance
  • Batch cooking and creating Kathi’s favorite fast food swap out: individual serving cubes of soup

Haven’t listened to Part 1 of Garden Or Grocery Store: Eating Like a Homesteader No Matter Where You Call Home? Don’t miss those tips! Click here to listen.

As promised, here are Kathi’s favorite soup and sandwich bread recipes.

Sandwich Bread
1 cups warm water
½ Tablespoon active dry yeast
2 T honey
2.5 cups all purpose flour, divided
1 teaspoon salt
2 T melted butter, divided

  1. Mix the water, yeast, and honey together. Add 2 cups flour, salt and 1 T melted butter together and mix.
  2. Put dough on a surface with ¼ cup of flour and knead it for about 5 minutes adding in the other half cup of flour to get a doughy texture.
  3. Take your dough ball and put it in a bowl. Cover it with a dishcloth and stick it in the oven with the light on for an hour (it should approximately double in size.)
  4. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
  5. Butter loaf pan. Shape the dough into roughly the size of the loaf pan.
  6. Let it double again, covered.
  7. Bake for 30 minutes.
  8. Let cool slightly on a wire rack before slicing.

Soup Bread
Prep time: 12-16 hours (rise time)
Cook time: 45 minutes

Ingredients:
1 1/2 cups water, room temperature to warm
1/2 teaspoon yeast
3 cups flour
1 1/2 teaspoons salt

Instructions:

  1. Mix all ingredients together in an ovenproof bowl. You may use a stand mixer to combine and leave the dough in the bowl.
  2. Cover the bowl with a kitchen towel and place it in the oven with the oven light on. Let it sit undisturbed for 12-16 hours.
  3. Remove the bowl from the oven and preheat the oven to 450°F.
  4. Line a Dutch oven with parchment paper. You may find it helpful to crinkle the parchment in your hands so it stays in place.
  5. Flour a surface and place the dough on that surface. Stretch and fold the dough ball, then place it in the parchment-lined Dutch oven.
  6. Use kitchen shears to make three snips on the top of the bread, allowing the bread to expand.
  7. Cook the bread in the covered Dutch oven for 30 minutes.
  8. After 30 minutes, uncover the Dutch oven and continue cooking for 15 more minutes.

Serve warm, accompanied by salted butter or a mix of oil and balsamic vinegar.

Yields: Dependent on serving size (typically 8-12 servings)

Kathi also mentioned her favorite cheese making kit. It can be found on Amazon. Kathi is not an affiliate of this product.

  • Mozzarella & Ricotta Cheese Making Kit | 5 Piece DIY Kit Includes Cheesecloth, Vegetable Rennet, Citric Acid, Cheese Salt, & Cooking Thermometer

Click here for the Clutter Free Academy newsletter and be notified when future episodes are released.

The Accidental Homesteader: What I’ve Learned About Chickens, Compost, and Creating Home

 

Homesteading [hohm-sted-ing]
noun
1. an act or instance of establishing a homestead.
2. the act of loving where you live so much that you actively ignore the fact that your house is trying to kill you on a regular basis.
For Kathi Lipp and her husband, Roger, buying a house in one of the most remote parts of Northern California was never part of the plan; many of life’s biggest, most rewarding adventures rarely are.

Kathi shares the hard-won wisdom she’s gained on her homestead journey to help you accomplish more at home, gain fresh perspective, and give yourself grace in the process. Here’s a handful of the lessons Kathi shares:

  • Prepare before the need arises
  • Everything is always in process, including us
  • Your best household solution is time and patience
  • You don’t have to do everything the hard way
  • Be open to new and better ways of doing things
  • A lot of small changes make a huge difference.
    Highly practical, humorous, and inspirational, The Accidental Homesteader will encourage you to live with more peace, joy, and contentment.

Order your copy of The Accidental Homesteader: What I’ve Learned About Chickens, Compost, and Creating Home here.

After listening to this episode, which “Eating Like a Homesteader” tip are to going to implement? 

Tell us in the comments!

Let’s stay connected

To share your thoughts:

  • Leave a note in the comment section below.

Leave an honest review on iTunes. Your ratings and reviews really help, and I read each one.

Subscribe on iTunes or subscribe to our newsletter now.

Meet Our Guest 

Roger Lipp

Roger is a productivity and quality engineer for a Fortune 50 company.

Roger helps teams reach their full productivity potential by teaching them the practical and simple steps to reach their goals. Roger and his wife, author Kathi Lipp, teach communicators how to share their message through social media and email marketing.

He and Kathi coauthored Happy Habits for Every Couple with Harvest House Publishers.

Transcript

#581 Garden Or Grocery Store: Eating Like a Homesteader No Matter Where You Call Home – Part 1

#581 Garden Or Grocery Store: Eating Like a Homesteader No Matter Where You Call Home – Part 1

581: Garden Or Grocery Store: Eating Like a Homesteader No Matter Where You Call Home, Part 1

Is it possible to eat like a homesteader even if you live in an apartment? Yes, it is!

Eating like a homesteader is really about being more purposeful and thoughtful about what you eat and where you source your food. In this episode, Kathi and Roger Lipp discuss what they have learned on their homestead journey about growing their own food in the garden as well as the non-gardening ways they source their food. For example:

  • The satisfaction of growing your own food
    • Start with a salsa garden/container garden.
  • Don’t have a garden? Try:
    • Shopping at a Farmers’ Markets or Roadside Stands
    • Joining a Food Swap or Bartering Group
    • Be a part of a Community Garden
  • And what to do if you have an abundance of produce

For those of you wondering where Kathi and Roger’s chickens fit into the “Eating like a Homesteader” plan, don’t be worried. Kathi’s philosophy is they don’t want to meet their meat.

Looking for the Meal Planning Calendar Kathi mentioned in this episode? It’s right here!

Click here for the Clutter Free Academy newsletter and be notified when future episodes are released.

The Accidental Homesteader: What I’ve Learned About Chickens, Compost, and Creating Home

 

Homesteading [hohm-sted-ing]
noun
1. an act or instance of establishing a homestead.
2. the act of loving where you live so much that you actively ignore the fact that your house is trying to kill you on a regular basis.
For Kathi Lipp and her husband, Roger, buying a house in one of the most remote parts of Northern California was never part of the plan; many of life’s biggest, most rewarding adventures rarely are.

Kathi shares the hard-won wisdom she’s gained on her homestead journey to help you accomplish more at home, gain fresh perspective, and give yourself grace in the process. Here’s a handful of the lessons Kathi shares:

  • Prepare before the need arises
  • Everything is always in process, including us
  • Your best household solution is time and patience
  • You don’t have to do everything the hard way
  • Be open to new and better ways of doing things
  • A lot of small changes make a huge difference.
    Highly practical, humorous, and inspirational, The Accidental Homesteader will encourage you to live with more peace, joy, and contentment.

Order your copy of The Accidental Homesteader: What I’ve Learned About Chickens, Compost, and Creating Home here.

After listening to this episode, which “Eating Like Homesteader” tip are to going to implement? 

Tell us in the comments!

Let’s stay connected

To share your thoughts:

  • Leave a note in the comment section below.

Leave an honest review on iTunes. Your ratings and reviews really help, and I read each one.

Subscribe on iTunes or subscribe to our newsletter now.

Meet Our Guest 

Roger Lipp

Roger is a productivity and quality engineer for a Fortune 50 company.

Roger helps teams reach their full productivity potential by teaching them the practical and simple steps to reach their goals. Roger and his wife, author Kathi Lipp, teach communicators how to share their message through social media and email marketing.

He and Kathi coauthored Happy Habits for Every Couple with Harvest House Publishers.

Transcript

#580 How to Plan Like a Homesteader No Matter Where You Call Home, Part 2

#580 How to Plan Like a Homesteader No Matter Where You Call Home, Part 2

580: How to Plan Like a Homesteader No Matter Where You Call Home, Part 2

 

Would you like some tips and tools to help you move from last minute scrambler to organized planner? Welcome to Part 2 of How to Plan Like A Homesteader where Kathi and her co host in life and on the mic Roger Lipp discuss strategies for advanced planning.

You might not need to worry about your snow blower not working like they do out in the wilderness they call home, but there are so many things you can plan in advance for to make your life run more smoothly. For example:

  • Pet and animal care
  • Regular medical appoints to avoid a medical crisis
  • And the many joys of putting a vacation on the calendar

If you haven’t listened to 579 How To Plan Like a Homesteader No Matter Where You Call Home, Part 1 yet, click here.

Also…today is the day that Kathi Lipp’s new (and visually stunning) book The Accidental Homesteader: What I’ve Learned About Chickens, Compost, and Creating Home releases! You can still get in on all the preorder goodies but you MUST order it today.
How?
Listen at the end of the episode to get the details on how to procure your Accidental Homesteader extras!

Click here for the Clutter Free Academy newsletter and be notified when future episodes are released.

The Accidental Homesteader: What I’ve Learned About Chickens, Compost, and Creating Home

 

Homesteading [hohm-sted-ing]
noun
1. an act or instance of establishing a homestead.
2. the act of loving where you live so much that you actively ignore the fact that your house is trying to kill you on a regular basis.
For Kathi Lipp and her husband, Roger, buying a house in one of the most remote parts of Northern California was never part of the plan; many of life’s biggest, most rewarding adventures rarely are.

Kathi shares the hard-won wisdom she’s gained on her homestead journey to help you accomplish more at home, gain fresh perspective, and give yourself grace in the process. Here’s a handful of the lessons Kathi shares:

  • Prepare before the need arises
  • Everything is always in process, including us
  • Your best household solution is time and patience
  • You don’t have to do everything the hard way
  • Be open to new and better ways of doing things
  • A lot of small changes make a huge difference.
    Highly practical, humorous, and inspirational, The Accidental Homesteader will encourage you to live with more peace, joy, and contentment.

Order your copy of The Accidental Homesteader: What I’ve Learned About Chickens, Compost, and Creating Home here.

Is there something you enjoy planning in advance? Vacations perhaps? 

Tell us in the comments!

Let’s stay connected

To share your thoughts:

  • Leave a note in the comment section below.

Leave an honest review on iTunes. Your ratings and reviews really help, and I read each one.

Subscribe on iTunes or subscribe to our newsletter now.

Meet Our Guest 

Roger Lipp

Roger is a productivity and quality engineer for a Fortune 50 company.

Roger helps teams reach their full productivity potential by teaching them the practical and simple steps to reach their goals. Roger and his wife, author Kathi Lipp, teach communicators how to share their message through social media and email marketing.

He and Kathi coauthored Happy Habits for Every Couple with Harvest House Publishers.

Transcript

#579 How to Plan Like a Homesteader No Matter Where You Call Home, Part 1

#579 How to Plan Like a Homesteader No Matter Where You Call Home, Part 1

579: How to Plan Like a Homesteader No Matter Where You Call Home, Part 1

Would you consider yourself a natural planner, or is it challenging for you to plan ahead? If you think planning doesn’t come easily, then you share that trait with Kathi and Roger Lipp, but moving to the Red House has forced them to plan ahead. In today’s podcast they share their hard-won wisdom with all of us.

Even if you don’t live on acres in the wilderness, you can still apply these lessons to lessen the stress in your life. For example:

  • Are you prepared for extreme weather events or other emergencies in your area?
  • Have you been thinking longer term in your financial planning?
  • What home maintenance issues are going to turn into big problems without attention?
  • Are you taking the time to build practical skills?

Kathi and Roger give us some helpful ideas in all these areas and more. Listen and find out how you can experience more peace in your home by planning ahead.  

Sign up here to get an email when Part Two comes out next week, when we will learn seven more areas to think about in order to plan like a homesteader.

The Accidental Homesteader: What I’ve Learned About Chickens, Compost, and Creating Home

 

Homesteading [hohm-sted-ing]
noun
1. an act or instance of establishing a homestead.
2. the act of loving where you live so much that you actively ignore the fact that your house is trying to kill you on a regular basis.
For Kathi Lipp and her husband, Roger, buying a house in one of the most remote parts of Northern California was never part of the plan; many of life’s biggest, most rewarding adventures rarely are.

Kathi shares the hard-won wisdom she’s gained on her homestead journey to help you accomplish more at home, gain fresh perspective, and give yourself grace in the process. Here’s a handful of the lessons Kathi shares:

  • Prepare before the need arises
  • Everything is always in process, including us
  • Your best household solution is time and patience
  • You don’t have to do everything the hard way
  • Be open to new and better ways of doing things
  • A lot of small changes make a huge difference.
    Highly practical, humorous, and inspirational, The Accidental Homesteader will encourage you to live with more peace, joy, and contentment.

Order your copy of The Accidental Homesteader: What I’ve Learned About Chickens, Compost, and Creating Home here.

Are you a natural planner or is planning ahead a challenge for you?

Tell us in the comments!

Let’s stay connected

To share your thoughts:

  • Leave a note in the comment section below.

Leave an honest review on iTunes. Your ratings and reviews really help, and I read each one.

Subscribe on iTunes or subscribe to our newsletter now.

Meet Our Guest 

Roger Lipp

Roger is a productivity and quality engineer for a Fortune 50 company.

Roger helps teams reach their full productivity potential by teaching them the practical and simple steps to reach their goals. Roger and his wife, author Kathi Lipp, teach communicators how to share their message through social media and email marketing.

He and Kathi coauthored Happy Habits for Every Couple with Harvest House Publishers.

Transcript