Poultry In The Time of COVID

Poultry In The Time of COVID

 

As many of you know, Roger and I’ve added to our family: four baby chickens. And while I had nine months to figure out what to do with a human baby (and still messed up on many of the details for that) I had about nine minutes to figure out what to do with these baby chicks. 

Fortunately, I had my own collection of chicken godmothers to help me through bringing our babies home (and everything that comes afterward.) 

Let me introduce you to the Chicken Godmother, Angela Roberge. A seasoned chicken raiser (and a seasoned chicken consumer), I asked her to share some of her favorite tips to make feathered mom-ing a little less daunting. 

If you’ve ever wondered if you could raise chicks, here’s everything you need to know to not run a fowl in your chicken attempts.

 

Poultry in the Time of COVID

 

Hey, all you cool chicks and chickens. 

Greetings from isolation.

In between cutting your own hair, baking your own bread and growing your own toilet paper, it behooves us all to get a step or two closer to the Keep-Calm-and-Homestead-On life of yesteryear. 

Some of my self-imposed, old-timey projects were one-and-done (ain’t nobody got time to render one’s own lard) and some stuck. Chickens, as it turns out, are very sticky. They provide, not only eggs, but hours of ChickTV™, and, if you’ve the stomach for it, a pretty kick-ass soup.

 

Here are a few things to get you started on your next obsession:

 

1 – Chickens need a minimum of 4 square feet of indoor space if they’re to be cooped up (hehe) for any length of time. As a Canadian, whose winters range from 27 months to 6.5 years, this means a twelve bird flock needs a 6’ x 8’ shed. 

2 – Food matters. Did you know diet determines yolk color? Battery hens (the sad birds shown in PETA videos) fed bottom of the barrel layer mash will have pasty yellow yolks,. whilst happy, free-ranging hens, scavenging bugs, worms, and frogs, fed high-quality food, will have a more Home Depot orange hue. 

There is nothing more smug smirk inducing than when your friends marvel at the difference between their normal, tepid fare and your rock star offering.

3 – Roosters are much like dishwashers. They’re not a necessity, but they’re handy to have around. They’ll ensure you’ve a supply of fertile eggs, scout out the best foraging places, and will go toe-to-toe with a coyote to protect his harem. They can be obnoxiously loud, however, at all times of day, so if you’ve got cranky neighbors, maybe reconsider.

4 – You’re familiar with the term “livestock,” right? Welp, if you allow livestock into your life, you’ll likely have to make room for her butthole cousin, Deadstock.  Basically, “Life is fragile, yo.” Expect and prepare for illness, predation, and accidents. I suggest going half-pharaoh and harden that heart. Love your chickens, just don’t LOVE your chickens.

5 – Chickens, like my rubbish taste in music, are super diverse. There are breeds that lay white, brown, even blue or green eggs. There are breeds that are adapted to particular climates, lay more eggs, are more likely to fly the proverbial coop, make noise, or be great moms. Do your research and pick the breed that’s right for you. 

Honestly, though? Even with the deepest of research, chickens have habits and personalities all their own. Your chickens might hide eggs, or dig up your garden, or follow you around, or try to attack you whilst your back is turned. For the latter, I recommend soup for dinner. 

6 – Good news: If properly cared for, chickens can live a decade. Bad news: They only lay for about three of those years. You’ve either got to be cool with feeding these freeloaders for a millennia after they’ve stopped paying their way, or comfortable shuffling off their mortal coil. 

7 – Like any pet, chickens are a commitment. They’ll need to be fed and watered even if it’s cold and rainy and you’ve got a sniffle. They make vacationing interesting, as your best friend might be okay feeding your cat while you’re away, but is decidedly less cool with 50 starving hens charging her and the grain bin. Start cultivating disposable friendships now.

8 – Daylight plays a large part in egg-laying. Chickens need 12-16 hours of light per day to keep them happily pooping your breakfast. So, when winter comes, or the sun explodes, you’ll either need to supplement with coop lighting or let them take a break for a few months. 

This break is the best option for the health of your flock. It’s like chickens store up their Sabbaths, remembering them and keeping them holy for 16 solid weeks.

9 – Chicken math – much like The Northern Lights, and narwhals, and children who LISTEN THE FIRST TIME – is a mystical but real phenomenon. You start out with your small coop, and a promise to your husband “not to worry, you’ll only get a couple, and it won’t be much work, and won’t it be fun to have fresh eggs for breakfast?” and suddenly, you’ve got a contractor over, planning your Chicken Palace because your flock now numbers 45, and you’re selling your contraband eggs out the back of your Cheerio-encrusted minivan, because FOUR DOZEN FRESH EGGS DAILY. ::cough::  

10 – You are not the only one that finds chicken delicious. The humble hen is on the bottom-most rung of the ladder. Plan to protect them from everything from mink to foxes to raccoons to neighborhood dogs. Fences, well-sealed coops, and even a 24/7 radio will be beneficial.

There’s no more helpless feeling than seeing your favorite hen hanging limp in the jaws of a coyote. While I’d never admit to flinging a garden fork at one, javelin style, I won’t *not* admit it, either.

Have I scared you off? Made you consider turning that coop into an Airbnb? I hope not. 

Chickens aren’t for the faint of heart, but they’re honestly one of my favorite parts of homesteading. There’s nothing quite like paying $20 for a bag of food that your flock will convert into eggs you could purchase at No Frills for $1.99.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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#415 How to Unhustle Your Life with Milena Regos

#415 How to Unhustle Your Life with Milena Regos

If you can relate to living a chaotic, overstuffed, and overscheduled life, then you definitely won’t want to miss this conversation. Join Kathi and her kindred friend Milena Regos as they help us discover how to unhustle our life and find courage, simplicity, joy, wellbeing, and a sense of purpose.

In this episode you will learn:

  • The Importance of a Reset
  • How to Re-evaluate Your Life
  • How to Build in Reset
  • Five Actionable Steps to Unhustle your life

 

 

 

Ready For Anything

Bad stuff happens all the time, but this doesn’t mean we have to live in constant fear.

Ready for Anything: Preparing Your Heart and Home for Any Crisis Big or Small gives finite simple steps for being proactive rather than reactive—helping you prepare your mind, heart, and home for any unfortunate circumstance. Full of stories and humor along with facts, tips, and lists, Kathi’s book offers a down-to-earth guide that will show you how to face the unexpected with confidence, relying on God’s strength and plan rather than giving in to fear and anxiety.

Her step-by-step plan is easy to implement and will help anyone become a better steward of their resources as well as be the neighbor who can help in a crisis rather than needing help. Kathi’s goal is to equip readers to be the frontline of helpers in any crisis, from a natural disaster to a friend’s job loss.

Order your copy of Ready For Anything today.

Links

www.unhustle.com

Learn more about Clutter Free for Life.

 

We would love to stay connected.

To share your thoughts:

Leave an honest review on iTunes. Your ratings and reviews really help and I read each one.

Subscribe on iTunes or subscribe to our newsletter now.

Meet Our Guest

Milena Regos

Milena Regos

Milena is an ex award-winning digital marketer turned mindful entrepreneur.

www.unhustle.com

https://www.instagram.com/unhustle

https://www.pinterest.com/unhustle/podcast/

Transcript

Read along with the podcast!

 

Clutter Free Academy Podcast #394

 

Clutter Free Home – Declutter

 

<<intro music>>

 

Kathi – Well, hey friends! Welcome to Clutter Free Academy, where our goal is to help you take small, doable steps to live every day with less clutter and more life. My name is Kathi Lipp. I’m the author of Clutter Free and here with me is the founder of Clutter Free Academy on Facebook, it is Tonya Kubo. Hey, Tonya!

 

Tonya – Hey, Kathi!

 

Kathi – I am so excited. We are in a series right now, because we are talking about my book that is coming out. It is The Clutter Free Home. I really do know the title of it. It’s coming out a week from today. 

 

Tonya – What?!

 

Kathi – I know. I’m super excited. So, we’ve got our launch team. If you haven’t gone over there, let’s make sure you’ve got all the information for that. Today, we’re talking about the third step in the book. It’s been really fun to test this out with our Clutter Free for Life. I call them Guinea Pigs, you called them Early Adopters. So they’ve been doing this for over a year and making such huge progress. It’s been super fun to watch. We want to talk about our decluttering system for The Clutter Free Home. 

 

Tonya – Sigh. It’s so fitting for Clutter Free Academy to talk about decluttering.

 

Kathi – Yes! Finally! We’ve talked about dedicating your space; really understanding what your space is about and how you’re using it. Decide. How do you want that space to feel/look/smell/all the things? Now, we’re going to declutter. The new decluttering system has two parts. It’s always had two parts, but we want to talk about daily decluttering and then deep decluttering. Daily decluttering? Fifteen minutes. Get ‘er done. 

 

Tonya – Yep!

 

Kathi – So, that’s the basis of everything we’ve ever done in Clutter Free. Would you talk through what you do in those fifteen minutes? ‘Cause you’ve been doing this for five years.

 

Tonya – Yeah, so I think the first thing I do is decide what I’m going to do. Because it’s fifteen minutes – I’ll use my bedroom as an example ‘cause I love to use my bedroom as an example – fifteen minutes is enough time to tackle one drawer in my dresser or my closet.

 

Kathi – One drawer in your closet. Or one area in your closet.

 

Tonya – What I was going to say is, if I have a very specific purpose in my closet. So, I’ll do a fifteen minute session and say, “I’m going to get rid of everything that is worn or I no longer love.”  Right? I’ll have my trash bag already there, and I’ll get everything situated to give away or to toss. I set my timer for fifteen minutes, and I just go through. It’s no mercy, because I’ve already pre-decided “This is what I’m doing. This is why I’m going to do it. This is how long I’m doing it.” Then, at the end of the fifteen minutes, I set another timer for 5 minutes, and it’s a mad dash to get those bags out to the car and get back in. Then, I’m done. I’m not the person who’s going to do the marathon. I’m not going to set my timer for another 15 minutes.

 

Kathi – ‘Cause we’ve done that before. 

 

Tonya – And it never ended well.

 

Kathi – No. It was always a bad thing. So, that’s our daily decluttering. But we, now, want to assign you a room. We want you to know that, when you’re doing your daily decluttering, there’s a schedule. So, we’re not just letting you go willy nilly, and you’re like, “I’ll do the laundry room, because that’s easy.” No no no. We’re going to assign you. Monday is your kitchen. I love this, because it starts out the week on a fresh note. So, for 15 minutes, I want you to get in there and declutter your kitchen. Make it all the things you want it to be. Tuesday is your living room. You’re getting in there. It’s just one shelf. One drawer. One something in your living room. Wednesday is your bedroom. This could be your bedroom or a kid’s bedroom or maybe a guest bedroom. How much time do you spend in your bedroom versus your girls’ bedroom?

 

Tonya – I spend more time in my bedroom. We only have a two bedroom house, so the bedrooms get a lot of use.  But more time in mine, because I need to sleep well. I don’t sleep well when I’m overwhelmed with stuff in my room.

 

Kathi – Yeah. If you’re afraid you’re going to trip and die in the middle of the night, it’s not a good way to live. It just isn’t. Okay, so you’re going to pick one bedroom. It’s not like you’re doing fifteen minutes in each bedroom. You’re just trying to declutter and get the stuff out of there. Okay, Thursday is bathrooms. So, it depends. Is it your master bathroom? Your half bathroom downstairs? The kids’ bathroom? Whatever it is. This is not cleaning time. This is decluttering time. This is getting stuff out of your space. Then, Friday is office area. Even if your office area is your kitchen. Wherever you do your office. Wherever you do your paperwork. That needs to be decluttered on the regular. In San Jose, our office area is, really, the third bedroom, where Roger works. I have an office too, but for our household, bills and mail and things like that, that’s the third bedroom. Here at The Red House, Roger has an office upstairs, but we have a closet that has all of our paperwork. All that kind of stuff. So, that’s where I spend my fifteen minutes. It’s just more detailed. It’s more detailed to do it in there. Okay, and Saturday is extra. So this could be your garage, your basement, your attic. If you have a storage unit, I would suggest you go over there and spend your fifteen minutes cleaning it out, doing what you need to do. Sundays you get off. Now, if your work schedule is such that Tuesday is your day of rest? Figure it out. You guys are all adults. You can figure this out. What’s going to work? Nobody’s going to come to your house and make sure you’re decluttering on Tuesday in the living room. 

 

Tonya – Right.

 

Kathi – We want you to be able to do all the things. So, that’s the first part. That’s the daily decluttering. Then, once a week, I want you to do a deep declutter. This is where you can get your hands dirty. We’re going to say sixty minutes. Here’s what I mean by that: You are going to deep declutter for 60 minutes. This is 60 minutes of getting stuff out of your house. I feel like once a week, I could do sixty minutes without analysis paralysis. 

 

Tonya – Right.

 

Kathi – ‘Cause you’re picking the spot in your house. My recommendation is: If your garage is driving you crazy, every week you do your sixty minutes in there, until you’re about 60% decluttered. Then, if you need to, move on to another space. Do it until you see a difference in there.

 

Tonya – Right. And can I dig into that a little tiny bit? I know that in Clutter Free for Life this has been a challenge. First of all, we’ve talked about realistic expectations before, people think “All I need is an hour and I’m supposed to get the whole room situated.” Then they get a little bit discourage when that doesn’t happen. I liked what you said, and I want to dig into that a little. You’re decluttering for an hour. That whole goal of that hour is to get stuff out. The goal is not to color code your drawers. The goal is not to sit there and match socks. The goal is to get the single socks into a bag and out of the house. The goal is to get, if you’re in my house, and you’ve got underwear from size four all the way to size eight. It’s to get the underwear out that the youngest one is not going to wear, because there’s nobody else.

 

Kathi – There’s nobody else coming along to claim that underwear.

 

Tonya – And I’m never going to fit in size four toddler underwear. That’s just not going to happen.

 

Kathi – Nope. It’s not going to happen. So, at some point, when you’ve got your place decluttered enough, you can start to do the organization that will help you out. But here’s what people do: They try to organize their clutter. They go in and say, “We’re going to go in and put a system in place in this closet.” But, here’s the thing. You’re organizing things that are junk. Anytime you try to organize junk, it just explodes on you.

 

Tonya – Can I share a personal example?

 

Kathi – Of course.

 

Tonya – Okay, so most of our listeners know that we moved into a house that was built in 1952. What I don’t think listeners know is that they sold us everything in the house. As somebody who grew up in a studio apartment with my kind of background, I didn’t really believe that the house was ours, for a while. It’s taken me awhile, right? So, I have not touched anything they left.

 

Kathi – What do you mean?

 

Tonya – So, we have two closets in the house. We have one in the bathroom and we have one in the hallway. So, if you open the hallway closet, the shelves are stuffed with their linens.

 

Kathi – Whoa.

 

Tonya – So, they left their curtains and their sheets and everything. I’ve never touched them. I haven’t even pulled them out and folded them to see if they would fit my bed. It’s been this shrine. So, I’ve been losing very precious space in my hallway, because I’m just like, “I just don’t believe they’re not going to come back and want their stuff.” Which, by the way, they don’t. I actually did ask. But as I’m sitting here, thinking, that would be the perfect use of an hour. I would get four shelves back.

 

Kathi – Yes. I’m going to hold you accountable for this.

 

Tonya – I wish our listeners could see your face. Kathi is very concerned for me, right now.

 

Kathi – Can I just tell you? The house is yours. 

 

Tonya – But, I think our listeners will appreciate the fact that there is a lot of ‘pinch ourselves’, right, in our decluttering journey? I just want to give hope to the listener who feels like they just can’t let stuff go. 

 

Kathi – Can I just tell you, no judgement? There’s no judgement.

 

Tonya – Oh, no. I don’t feel judgement. But, I laugh because I’ve been in this journey a long time. It wasn’t until you were talking about that just now. You were talking about the storage unit, and I was like, “That’s basically a storage unit inside my house.”

 

Kathi – It totally is.

 

Tonya – I open the cabinet and I go, “Yeah, no, I’m just going to close that.”

 

Kathi – So, here’s my question for you. This is one of the things I don’t think we talk enough about in Clutter Free Academy, but I think it would be super helpful. What is your vision for that closet? What could that become for you? 

 

Tonya – I want that to be, it sounds silly, but I want my paper towels and my cleaning stuff to go there, because it’s so centrally located for the home. I’ve thought, over time, “Oh, that’s where blankets should go. Oh, that’s where towels should go.” That’s not actually where I want those things. I don’t want to trip over the Costco package of paper towels that are left on the floor because I don’t have any other shelves that are tall enough. But I do in there. It’s just funny to me how, again, I’ve lived there over a year, and it’s never occurred to me. 

 

Kathi – But isn’t that how we are? We have shrines in our own house. 

 

Tonya – Right. We talked about this before, right? We let the house happen to us. I love that this is a way to take ownership.

 

Kathi – Okay, so in the next two months, could you declutter that closet?

 

Tonya – Well, I could probably do it in the next weekend. None of the stuff is mine. I can’t even imagine wanting to keep any of it because it doesn’t belong to me.

 

Kathi – It’s just a big old Goodwill run.

 

Tonya – Yeah. I really think so. How funny is this? I’m tickled by myself right now.

 

Kathi – Yeah! No! I totally get it, though. I really do. There are things, even in this Red House. We have a barn. Okay, that’s weird. We have a barn. But, I don’t know exactly what’s out there. 

 

Tonya – Right, ‘cause you’re in the same situation, where they sold a lot of the stuff to you.

 

Kathi – Yeah, it’s a very unusual circumstance. You’re like, “Should I keep this? I don’t even know what it’s for.” But, it’s like, “Is that the key for keeping the whole house together?” So, part of it is research to find out, “What is this doohickey?” I’ve gone through everything in our garage. I’ve touched everything in the garage. I know what’s in there. The barn is still a bit of a mystery to me. We will uncover these things together, Tonya. 

 

Tonya – That’s what I like about Clutter Free Academy, though, right? We do this together.

 

Kathi – Yes. Okay, so I’m super excited about this, guys. We want you to join the journey with us. So, if you have ordered a copy of the book, go ahead and preorder. That is super helpful to us as authors.

 

Tonya – Yes it is.

 

Kathi – But, also, I would love for you to be on this journey with us. We will be telling your more about that. So, Tonya, thanks for being here.

 

Tonya – Thanks for having me.

 

Kathi – And friend, thank you for being here. You’ve been listening to Clutter Free Academy. I’m Kathi Lipp. Now, go create the clutter free life you were always intended to live.

 

<<music>>

 

*see show notes in podcast post above for any mentioned items

 

#414 Big Living in Small Space – Running your Business (and now homeschool) from the Space that You Have

#414 Big Living in Small Space – Running your Business (and now homeschool) from the Space that You Have

We are all trying to get more life into the four walls we are seeking to stay safe within. Adjusting to this new normal has been a challenge for many of us. Today, Kathi and Jen Pepito, of Peaceful Press, who has been doing this for a while, are discussing big living in a small space. Whether you are running a business, newly homeschooling, or doing a combination of all the things inside your home, you will definitely want to learn about these great principles for managing life in a small space, including:

  • How to keep it all together in a small space
  • How to stay productive in a small space
  • Classic principles that are great to use right now
  • Jen’s #1 tip for suddenly homeschooling

 

Clutter-Free Home

Are you longing for a place of peace from which you can love others well? The Clutter-Free Home: Making Room for Your Life is your room-by-room guide to decluttering, reclaiming, and celebrating every space of your home.

In The Clutter-Free Home, you’ll walk through each room of your house to create organizational zones that are not only functional and practical but create places of peace that reflect your personality. Kathi will help you tackle the four-step process to reveal the home you’ve always dreamed of, and then transform it into a haven that reflects who you truly are meant to be.

 

Links

Discover more about Jennifer Pepito and find free samples at The Playful Pioneers and The Kind Kingdom here:
https://jenniferpepito.com/
https://www.thepeacefulpreschool.com/

coupon code for 15% off for listeners: CLUTTERFREE

fv-free (2)

Prairie Fires: The American Dreams of Laura Ingalls Wilder

The Prize Winner of Defiance, Ohio

Cheaper By the Dozen

Learn more about Clutter Free for Life.

We would love to stay connected.

To share your thoughts:

Leave an honest review on iTunes. Your ratings and reviews really help and I read each one.

Subscribe on iTunes or subscribe to our newsletter now.

Meet Our Guest

Jennifer Pepito

Jennifer Pepito

Jennifer Pepito is the founder of The Peaceful Press (http://thepeacefulpress.com), a company committed to providing young families with learning resources that promote connection between parents and children. Her resources have been used by thousands of families and earn rave reviews from mothers of young children. Jennifer’s writing has been featured in several online and print journals, including Wild and Free, The M.O.B. Society, and Home Educating Family. She also speaks at conferences and retreats, including the Wild and Free conference, Christian Home Educators Association, and Arise.

Transcript

 

 

How-To Have a Clutter Free (& Worry Free) Garage Sale

How-To Have a Clutter Free (& Worry Free) Garage Sale

 

Two summers ago, an older couple gifted my daughter a large number of household items as they moved out of state. The goal? Have a garage sale and make money for college.

 

We spent nearly a week sorting and transporting items, another week preparing for the sale, and a full weekend selling. The result was a whopping $600.

 

On the other hand, our neighbor who planned to move to Poland later that year joined in the sale, strategically added items to her lot across the street, and made nearly twice the money.

 

Two garage sales. Very different results.

 

Consider Your Options                   

 

Before deciding to embark on a sale, weigh the time and effort required with other options.

 

  • Do you only have a few great items in new or like-new condition? Maybe an online marketplace or auction site would be better.

 

  • Do you have quite a few items, but not enough to draw in a crowd? Consider connecting with others for a community or block sale. Donate to a church or non-profit sale. Or invite a neighbor or friend to join forces to draw a wider group of shoppers.

 

  • Garage sales can make a lot of money. Karen M, a Clutter-Free member, recently had a sale and “with not too much effort made $1,000.” On the other hand, garage sales can be a lot of work for little to no money. I’ve hosted several garage sales that netted in the neighborhood of a total of $100-$200. Are you okay with either result?

 

Once you’ve decided a garage sale is the best option, you will need to get to work.

 

 

Time

 

A terrific garage sale takes time. Sometimes a lot of time.

 

  • Be prepared. Gather items, price and display them, spend 2-3 days hosting the sale, and commit to clean up and disposing of items that do not sell.

 

  • Don’t underestimate the importance of the weather. If it is too hot, too cold, too windy, too rainy then your sale may be a bust. Pick the right time of year, keep an eye on the weather forecast, and choose the most temperate part of the day for sale hours.

 

Do you have enough time to make it worthwhile?

 

If so, choose a date and put it on the calendar.

 

 

Space & Location

 

You’ll need space to store items until the sale begins and a location to hold the sale.

 

  • Where will you store items before the sale begins?

 

  • Are you in a prime location for a sale? Or could you hold the sale at a friend or neighbor’s house that is easier to find with better exposure?

 

  • Some neighborhoods do not allow yard/garage sales and have restrictions about street parking. Be sure to check any homeowner agreements that may impact your sale.

 

Where will you hold your sale?

 

Help

 

Sale days will be much more manageable (and fun!) if you have friends and family by your side.

 

  • You will need a lunch or restroom break.

 

  • A crowd may arrive all at once.

 

  • Friends and family help keep you company during the slower parts of the day.

 

  • Someone to keep reminding you why you are decluttering.

 

Who will stand by your side while you sell your stuff?

 

 

Gather Your Items

 

Before you can have a sale, you have to know what you’re selling. 

 

  • Make a pile. Load up boxes. Sort and organize. Go through closets, drawers, basements, and garages and come up with the items you’ll sell. (This is a perfect time to declutter!)

 

  • Group like items. Furniture, books, clothing, baby clothes, kid’s items, tools, dishes, kitchenware, appliances, household items, and so on. If you bought it, you can probably sell it.

 

Do you have enough desirable items to warrant a garage sale?

Pricing

 

“There is no better deterrent from bringing new items into your home than seeing that candle you bought for $24.95 re-sell for only $2.50. This is the Clutter Tax we all pay for excess stuff.” -Karen M

 

  • Be realistic. Garage sales draw bargain hunters. It is unlikely you can sell an item for even a fraction of what you paid. Even like-new items may not sell for more than half the original price. Exceptions: Certain collectibles. Antiques. Refurbished items.

 

  • Decide ahead of time if you’re willing to dicker or if you’ll have a half-price hour or a last call (selling everything for a dollar) at the end of the day.

 

Remember your objective is not to make money, it’s to get rid of stuff. Bringing it back in the house defeats the purpose of having a clutter-free garage sale.

 

 

Cash

 

A few days before the sale, visit the bank. Obtain a wide variety of bills in different denominations. If you priced items under a dollar you will also need change.

 

Display.

 

Staging is important!

 

Put the “wows” upfront. You want stuff that will literally stop traffic. Furniture, tools, and electronics are your best bet for getting a spouse to pull the car to the curb.

Clothes. Hanging, easily viewed clothing sells best. A garment rack is ideal, but a shower rod or tautly hung rope can work. The next best option is folded clothes preferably on a table. Be sure to put up a sign that says “Hangers Not Included” unless you’re decluttering hangers too.

 

Books, CDs, DVDs. Create a temporary display. If you have enough shelf space, place the front covers face out. Next best option? A table. Try to keep the shelves looking full (this is a great job for kids).

 

Group items. Housewares, small appliances, bath items, baby clothes or toys, yard items, etc. But make sure there’s plenty of space between displays for people to comfortably move.

 

Advertising

 

On the web. Online groups exist to help you get the word out. Check into your favorite sale sites, neighborhood, or market place, and add your listing. Highlight the kinds of things you’re selling (tools, kids’ clothes, furniture, etc.) so you attract the right buyers.

 

On the street. Create large, readable signs to attract more drive-by traffic. Neon poster board is great for this. Add a few secure balloons to draw attention.

 

Check city ordinances regarding sign size and location of display signs. Although many people use utility poles, this often violates city rules. Also, be a good steward and collect all signs at the end of your sale.

 

Tell your friends. Share your goals. Be sure to let your Facebook or Instagram friends know as well.

 

Newspaper. Running a cheap ad in your local newspaper or an online classified service may bring you more shoppers.

 

Back-Up Plan

What will you do with anything leftover?

Who will be taking the items away?

Where will it go?

 

If you were willing to get rid of the stuff in the first place, don’t let it wiggle it’s way back in.

 

With a lot of planning and a bit of hard work, you can have a successful garage sale. Whether your sale makes $100 or $1000, if you’ve met your goal to declutter you’ve triumphed! Your heart and home will be lighter.

 

Your turn. What additional tips can you add for a clutter-free sale?

 

*Thank you, Karen M, (of Clutter Free), and Kathi Lipp for contributing strategic suggestions included in this article.

 

April Kidwell lives in the Pacific Northwest with her science-geek husband, soon-to-fly young adult children, three dogs, two cats and a gecko. She writes Contemporary and Historical Christian romance for the Waiting Heart and comes from a long line of “what-ifers.” (What if we need it? What if we make it useable again? What if…?) Connect with her at https://www.blessfulwritings.comhttps://www.instagram.com/blessfulwritings/, and https://www.facebook.com/Blessfulwritings/.

 

We would love to stay connected.

To share your thoughts:

Leave an honest review on iTunes. Your ratings and reviews really help and I read each one.

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#413 Do Without – How to Best Manage Your Home During a Time of Crisis

#413 Do Without – How to Best Manage Your Home During a Time of Crisis

Back for our final session of use it up, wear it out, make do, do without are Kathi and her very own Roger Lipp. In the first two episodes with Tonya Kubo, leader of Clutter Free Academy, we learned to use it up and wear it out. In the third episode, Kathi and Roger talk about how to make do, and now they are back talking about the concept of do without. With all of us going through the current covid crisis together, we have all learned something about ourselves. Listen in to find out about some of the things Kathi and Roger have learned about themselves during this time and their answers to:

  • What can we do without?
  • What can we substitute?
  • How can we make another experience better?
  • Has this earned a space in my house?

 

 

Ready For Anything

Bad stuff happens all the time, but this doesn’t mean we have to live in constant fear.

Ready for Anything: Preparing Your Heart and Home for Any Crisis Big or Small gives finite simple steps for being proactive rather than reactive—helping you prepare your mind, heart, and home for any unfortunate circumstance. Full of stories and humor along with facts, tips, and lists, Kathi’s book offers a down-to-earth guide that will show you how to face the unexpected with confidence, relying on God’s strength and plan rather than giving into fear and anxiety.

Her step-by-step plan is easy to implement and will help anyone become a better steward of their resources as well as be the neighbor who can help in a crisis rather than needing help. Kathi’s goal is to equip readers to be the frontline of helpers in any crisis, from a natural disaster to a friend’s job loss.

Order your copy of Ready For Anything today.

Links

Air Fryer

America’s Test Kitchen

Homestead Seasoning from Savory Spices

The Deva Cut

Learn more about Clutter Free for Life.

 

We would love to stay connected.

To share your thoughts:

Leave an honest review on iTunes. Your ratings and reviews really help and I read each one.

Subscribe on iTunes or subscribe to our newsletter now.

Meet Our Guest

Roger Lipp

Roger Lipp

Roger is a productivity and quality engineer for a Fortune 50 company.

Roger helps teams reach their full productivity potential by teaching them practical and simple steps to reach their goals. Roger and his wife, author Kathi Lipp, teach communicators how to share their message through social media and email marketing.

He and Kathi coauthored Happy Habits for Every Couple with Harvest House Publishers.

.

Transcript

#412 Make Do: How to Best Manage Your Home During a Time of Crisis

#412 Make Do: How to Best Manage Your Home During a Time of Crisis

Kathi is continuing this four-part series with her very special guest, who she had to use all of her powers of persuasion to convince to join her, her betrothed, Roger Lipp. Tonya Kubo, leader of the Clutter Free Academy Facebook Group, helped us with the first two parts of Kathi’s favorite WWII quote in Use It Up and Wear It Out, and now Roger is here to help with the third part, Make Do. So, how do we make do in an era of being so heavily advertised to, one in which we get held hostage by our own wants and desires? Listen in as we discover practical tips on how to answer these questions on making do:

  • Lower Our Expectations?
  • How Can I Not Spend Money on This?
  • What Do We Already Have?

 

Ready For Anything

Bad stuff happens all the time, but this doesn’t mean we have to live in constant fear.

Ready for Anything: Preparing Your Heart and Home for Any Crisis Big or Small gives finite simple steps for being proactive rather than reactive—helping you prepare your mind, heart, and home for any unfortunate circumstance. Full of stories and humor along with facts, tips, and lists, Kathi’s book offers a down-to-earth guide that will show you how to face the unexpected with confidence, relying on God’s strength and plan rather than giving in to fear and anxiety.

Her step-by-step plan is easy to implement and will help anyone become a better steward of their resources as well as be the neighbor who can help in a crisis rather than needing help. Kathi’s goal is to equip readers to be the frontline of helpers in any crisis, from a natural disaster to a friend’s job loss.

Order your copy of Ready For Anything today.

Links

Tonya Kubo

The Good Neighbors

The Tightwad Gazette

Learn more about Clutter Free for Life.

We would love to stay connected.

To share your thoughts:

Leave an honest review on iTunes. Your ratings and reviews really help and I read each one.

Subscribe on iTunes or subscribe to our newsletter now.

Meet Our Guest

Roger Lipp

Roger Lipp

Roger is a productivity and quality engineer for a Fortune 50 company.

Roger helps teams reach their full productivity potential by teaching them practical and simple steps to reach their goals. Roger and his wife, author Kathi Lipp, teach communicators how to share their message through social media and email marketing.

He and Kathi coauthored Happy Habits for Every Couple with Harvest House Publishers.

Transcript

Read along with the podcast!