Spring Fling Day #1: Let’s Declutter the Kitchen

Spring Fling Day #1: Let’s Declutter the Kitchen

It is day one of the Spring Fling and we are going to start easy … in the kitchen. If you declutter the kitchen, it will make a big difference in how you cook and enjoy family time together.


Time to declutter the kitchen

The kitchen doesn’t seem to hold as much sentimental attachment as some of the other rooms in our homes, so let’s get the 20 items out of there. I would encourage you to really look at your stuff. Do you have six cookie sheets? Unless you are planning to take the place of Mrs. Fields, that probably is overkill. Could you donate a couple so that someone who is baking their cookies off of aluminum foil has a safe way to make cookies for their kids? One thing I realized as I was getting rid of my 20 things in the kitchen? It was hard! Not because I was attached to things, but because I’ve been decluttering so much over the years that I really do have my essentials only in the kitchen. That is Clutter Free progress, baby!

What to do in the kitchen

Instructions:

1. Set up your three boxes/totes and two bags.

2. Start with one drawer or one shelf. 3. Do NOT pull everything in your kitchen out and sort through it. That’s how your kids manage their toys, and how does THAT work for you?

Bonus: You know those days when you feel extra motivated? Yes, they may only come around once a year, but today could be that day! If so, here are some extra things you could do that will bring you more peace in your kitchen:

Get Yourself Organized for Christmas Project 14: Prep Your Kitchen

Get Yourself Organized for Christmas Project 14: Prep Your Kitchen

Prep Your Kitchen

It’s time to give the kitchen a little TLC and prep your kitchen for the holidays. Spend some time today clearing any clutter hanging around your countertops. Put away mail, Christmas cards, leftover Christmas decoration containers, etc. Also, here are some basic tips of things you can do to spruce up quickly.

Assignment:

  • Clean your sink up so it is nice and shiny.
  • Clean out any science experiments from the fridge.
  • Wipe out your pantry, fridge or cupboards of tiny crumbs.
  • Complete your meal plan for the month and finish the shopping list.
  • Pull out any serving dishes, holiday dishes or platters you may need and wash off any dust.
  • Restock your pantry with any essentials you will need for cooking or baking.

For more details: Get Your Christmas Organized Page 83

 

Share your thoughts:

Share with us all that you accomplished! For some this may have taken a while, for others, it may have been easier than you thought. Did it go by quickly or did you take the time to gut your kitchen? Do you have any tips to share with someone else? What did YOU do?

Avoiding Overwhelm:

Does the kitchen clutter seem too overwhelming? If you’re waiting for the kitchen fairies to clean up, you could be waiting a while. Instead, break down your kitchen chores into micro-steps (the very smallest bits possible) and then take a moment to do the first micro-step.

And join us over on the Clutter Free Academy Facebook group where we encourage one another and stay accountable as we become Clutter Free!

Avoid the Stress of Hosting a Shindig: Yes, It’s Possible!

Avoid the Stress of Hosting a Shindig: Yes, It’s Possible!

I shoo the dog from the cramped kitchen, greet new arrivals, and point to the bottle opener’s location — “The next drawer over. No, other side. There, in the front” — sticky sauce splatters the stovetop. Breathe.

“What can I do to help?” she asks.

I feign casual confidence: “I’ve got it under control” — and change the subject to her family’s most recent adventure.

The truth is, I don’t know what needs to be done. Or how to articulate it. So I might as well do it myself.

Avoid the stress of hosting?

Does this happen to you? Last-minute details keep you from enjoying time with your guests. And when someone offers to help, you’re so busy doing that you can’t think if there’s anything someone else could do.

Summer’s around the corner and, with it, the opportunity to host year-end celebrations, picnics, and potlucks. But can you host a meal, and truly enjoy your friends, without all the stress?

Is There a Better Way?

It began unintentionally.

My head throbs. But I’m unwilling to cancel tonight’s social event.

I can always excuse myself early; there’s no reason others can’t have fun!

Knowing my middle-aged brain is more compromised than usual, I list all the menu items and tasks to perform on our kitchen whiteboard.

I work my way down the list, erasing items as I complete them. When guests arrive, I hear the familiar question: “What can I do to help?”

“I’ve got it under control …”

I stop, look at the whiteboard, and say, “Could you finish the deviled eggs?”

Ahhh … My headache begins to fade.

Other guests offer to help. I ask one to cut strawberries. Another wipes down the picnic table.

Peals of laughter and conversation fill the air as we prepare the meal together.

Reduce the Stress in Your Celebrations

We’ve since perfected this dinnertime ritual:

  • Line the countertop with the necessary serving dishes
  • On a sticky note in each dish, provide simple instructions (e.g., fruit salad — strawberries, blueberries, banana, grapes).
  • Hang a list of non-food instructions on the fridge (e.g., bring chairs from the garage)

Now you can enjoy your guests from the moment they arrive rather than ushering them into the living room with drinks.

Or tripping over them as you attempt to balance food prep and conversation.

You’ll create a welcoming atmosphere and your guests will feel at home — nothing says “you’re family” like being asked to set the table!

You may even avoid scrubbing sticky sauce from your stovetop.

Need more ideas for focusing on fun and fellowship instead of stressing out about shindigs? Stop by my blog to grab your free copy of Helpful Hospitality Hints: How to Host a Meal Without Losing Your Mind.


Kendra Burrows delights in encouraging others to see God’s grace in the everyday — when she isn’t chasing the animals (and boys!) out of her kitchen. She’s still learning hospitality requires we share it all, not do it all. Connect with her at www.kendraburrows.com.

 

Spring Fling Day #1: Let’s Declutter the Kitchen

Spring Fling Day #1: Let’s Declutter the Kitchen

It is day one of the Spring Fling and we are going to start easy … in the kitchen. If you declutter the kitchen, it will make a big difference in how you cook and enjoy family time together.


Time to declutter the kitchen

The kitchen doesn’t seem to hold as much sentimental attachment as some of the other rooms in our homes, so let’s get the 20 items out of there. I would encourage you to really look at your stuff. Do you have six cookie sheets? Unless you are planning to take the place of Mrs. Fields, that probably is overkill. Could you donate a couple so that someone who is baking their cookies off of aluminum foil has a safe way to make cookies for their kids? One thing I realized as I was getting rid of my 20 things in the kitchen? It was hard! Not because I was attached to things, but because I’ve been decluttering so much over the years that I really do have my essentials only in the kitchen. That is Clutter Free progress, baby!

What to do in the kitchen

Instructions:

1. Set up your three boxes/totes and two bags.

2. Start with one drawer or one shelf. 3. Do NOT pull everything in your kitchen out and sort through it. That’s how your kids manage their toys, and how does THAT work for you?

Bonus: You know those days when you feel extra motivated? Yes, they may only come around once a year, but today could be that day! If so, here are some extra things you could do that will bring you more peace in your kitchen:

  • Fling 20 things in your fridge.
  • Fling 20 things in your freezer.
  • Fling 20 things in your pantry.
  • Fling 20 ketchup/taco sauce/soy sauce packages.
  • Fling 20 take out menus in your junk drawer.

Eps #243: Clutter Free Kitchen: Tips to Loving Creating in Your Own Home

Eps #243: Clutter Free Kitchen: Tips to Loving Creating in Your Own Home

ListenNow

Recipes

French Toast from America’s Test Kitchen

Ingredients
1 large egg
2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted, plus extra for frying
¾ cup milk
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
2 tablespoons granulated sugar
? cup unbleached all-purpose flour
¼ teaspoon table salt
4 – 5 slices day-old challah bread, (3/4-inch-thick) or 6 to 8 slices day-old sandwich bread

1. Heat 10- to 12-inch skillet (preferably cast-iron) over medium heat for 5 minutes. Meanwhile, beat egg lightly in shallow pan or pie plate; whisk in butter, then milk and vanilla, and finally sugar, flour, and salt, continuing to whisk until smooth. Soak bread without oversaturating, about 40 seconds per side for challah or 30 seconds per side for sandwich bread. Pick up bread and allow excess batter to drip off; repeat with remaining slices.

2. Swirl 1 tablespoon butter in hot skillet. Transfer prepared bread to skillet; cook until golden brown, about 1 minute 45 seconds on first side and 1 minute on the second. Serve immediately. Continue, adding 1 tablespoon butter to skillet for each new batch.

Insta-Pot Chicken Enchiladas 

Ingredients:
3 chicken breasts
1 cup stock
Salt
Pepper
Cumin

Pressure cook 12 mins, slow release, shred.

Mix:
1 jar green enchilada sauce
1 carton sour cream
1 bag jack cheese
Chicken

Roll chicken mix in corn tortillas.  Cover with a jar of green enchilada sauce and more jack cheese.  Bake at 350 for 20 min

Kathi and co-host Erin MacPherson discuss Clutter Free Kitchens.  When your kitchen is clutter free you can cook more and find everything. They also share the tools they use that they can’t live without.  From the instant pot to the ninja coffee maker they each share their favorite kitchen tools.

This post isn’t about things you should run out and buy.  You don’t need more stuff, but this about you having things that make you happy and your life more enjoyable.  Kathi talks about purchasing tools, not trinkets to make your home a better place to be.

Share with us your kitchen tool that you can’t live without in the comments.

The List of Kitchen Tools:

Below is a list of the kitchen items Kathi and Erin can’t live without.

Victorinox Swiss Classic 3 1/4″ Paring Knife, Spear Tip, Serrated, Red

Instant Pot $99

Aerolatte Original Electric Hand Held Milk Frother, Satin 19.99

Ninja Coffee Maker $138

The Complete America’s Test Kitchen TV Show Cookbook 2001-2017: Every Recipe from the Hit TV Show with Product Ratings and a Look Behind the Scenes Hardcover – October 4, 2016

Spicy shelf stack Organizer

Meet Our Guest

Co-host - Erin MacPherson

Co-host - Erin MacPherson

Erin MacPherson lives in Austin, Texas with her husband Cameron, her sons Joey and Will and her daughter Kate. She is the author of “The Christian Mama’s Guide Series“, a staff writer for Dun & Bradstreet and a freelancer for publications like Thriving Family Magazine, MOPS MomSense, FamilyLife Magazine, Daily Guideposts and BEMag. She blogs about her life, her kids and her faith at ChristianMamasGuide.com.